Classic Potato Salad, Low Sodium Style!

While Maine is known for its succulent lobstah and juicy blueberries, the state’s largest agricultural crop is actually potatoes. (Click here for an interesting history of the Maine potato.) While at the farmer’s market on Saturday, I picked up a small bag of native white potatoes and today I’d like to showcase them in perhaps the most beloved of all summer picnic fare: Classic Potato Salad. I’ve tried many versions of potato salad over the years and doubtless you have too. Some sweet, some savory, but without exception most slathered in mayonnaise. I will NOT speak ill of my most favorite condiment. But truthfully, mayo is out on a strict low-sodium diet. Thankfully this recipe, adapted from the No-Salt, Lowest-Sodium International Cookbook, makes use of another dreamy favorite, sour cream. In combination with the zing of scallion & onion and a whisper of garlic-infused vinaigrette, it will forever change your stance towards this picnic classic. I’m not exaggerating when I say this is one of the tastiest potato salads I’ve ever had, low sodium or not. All the traditional elements are here: potatoes (of course), cubed hard boiled egg, celery, onion, creamy dressing. There’s not a single shake of salt and yet – SO MUCH FLAVOR!! Prepare to be amazed.

Yields 4 servings.

SODIUM CONTENT: 68 mg per serving

INGREDIENTS:

3 medium white, red or Yukon gold potatoes, scrubbed and unpeeled
1 T. olive oil
1 T. apple cider vinegar
1 garlic clove, minced
1/8 t. ground white pepper
2 large eggs, hard-boiled, peeled and diced
1/2 c. diced red onion
1/2 c. diced celery (about 1 stalk)
2 scallions, sliced thinly (green and white portions)
1/2 c. sour cream

DIRECTIONS:

Place the potatoes in a pot, add enough water to cover and place over high heat. Bring to a boil. Boil for 20-25 minutes, until potatoes are cooked through but NOT soft. Remove potatoes from pot and set aside to cool. Once cool enough to handle, gently peel, then cut into 1-inch cubes. Place potatoes in a large mixing bowl.

Measure the olive oil and vinegar into a food processor or blender. Add the minced garlic and pulse to puree. Once smooth, pour over the potatoes (use a spatula to get every last drop). Sprinkle the white pepper over the potatoes. Add the chopped eggs, onion, celery and scallion to the bowl, along with the sour cream. Mix together very gently. Serve immediately, or cover and refrigerate until serving.

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9 Responses to Classic Potato Salad, Low Sodium Style!

  1. I grew up in the Midwest, which means I loves me some ‘taters! And some ‘tatersalad! Looks amazing, (as always) Dishy! :)

  2. shambo says:

    Christy, I missed some of your posts. My computer crashed, and it took a week to get a new one delivered. It’s taken me several days to get everything transferred over to my new machine, but I’m almost done.

    I love potato salad. One of my tricks is to do just what your recipe calls for. While the potatoes are still warm, I toss them with a vinaigrette. The flavor is absorbed and really does make up for the lack of salt. I do the same with pasta salads too.

    When a salad recipe calls for straight mayo, I usually combine half mayonnaise and half sour cream. Sometimes I do thirds of mayo, sour cream, & yogurt.

    Your salad looks wonderful. I only wish I had some potatoes on hand.

  3. Tammy says:

    What, no mayo??? I’ll definitely be making this one…I’m in your hubby’s camp and prefer sour cream. It’s freezing here today, so may wait til it feels a bit more summery.

  4. hmmm, i’ve never gotten onboard with potato salad and will only eat 2 macaroni salads–my mom’s and one from richard’s deli in long branch, nj. it took me TEN years of tiny tastes each time we went to richard’s for me to acquire a taste for it. sad but true. my mom’s potato salad is all mayo-ey and i just never developed a taste for it. here’s a story for you about potato salad: jess was hosting a party at her house last year and we decided to do a deli platter with sandwiches. we went to king’s (grocery store) and couldn’t pick a potato salad from the deli because neither of us would try the two varieties they offered. lol. we stood in front of the deli case bickering: you try it! NO, YOU try it! in the end, we just bought the white potato salad without tasting it.

    anyway, i’m rambling. your photos are great and make a dish i don’t relish look pretty darn good. hope the weather has cooled off up there–we had some record heat down here! miss ya, girlie. xo

  5. Christy says:

    Be careful what you wish for, Nat.. Last week it was in the 90s here – today in the 50s! And raining! S’ok though – Maddie’s graduation is this week and I need to bake 12+ dozen cookies today. Better rain than sun – I’d be tempted to be outside weeding.

    Thanks for the praise for the potato salad. It was delicious! I made a second version later last week – garlic potato salad – will have to post that after the graduation festivities are over. XO

  6. Hunter says:

    THANK YOU!! when my father in law came home and told us the doctor had put him on a no salt diet I was almost distraught as the cook of the house and a big foodie i loved salt and having to learn how to cook without it was tough until i found this website! thank you so much for your wonderful recipes I had to substitute sour cream for plain UN-sweetened Yoghurt but it was still very delicious

    • Christy says:

      Fabulous to hear, Hunter!! SO glad you enjoyed it, and great substitution by the way. Keep up the excellent work! Wishing you much health & happiness, Christy

  7. Pingback: Good Times in the City…. | Eat.. Pray… Turn Up!!

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